The Digital Customer Experience Blog

Your source of insights for a successful digital transformation.

How To Utilize The Explorer Archetype in Digital Customer Experience

explorer

Archetypal brand theory provides a sound methodology for establishing a memorable and compelling brand identity, one that can found relevant digital customer experiences, cross lifestyle and cultural boundaries, and translate into success that endures.

Among the 12 brand archetypes that we have studied, thanks to the deep analysis provided by by Margaret Mark and Carol S. Pearson, Joseph Campbell and, before them, Carl Jung, The Explorer brand archetype emphasize self over others and autonomy over belonging.

The story of the Explorer is characterized by science fiction movies such as Star Trek (“To Boldly Go Where No Man Has Gone Before”) and narratives about a transition from homeland, job or marriage. Books that exemplify the explorer archetype include F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby and Homer’s The Odyssey.

A brand or product resinates well with this archetype if it makes people feel free and is nonconformist.

The Explorer core desire is for the freedom to find out who you are through exploring the world. His goal is to experience a better, more authentic, more fulfilling life, while his greatest fear is getting trapped and conforming.

Explorers tend to see themselves as ahead of their time, that’s why they are particularly sensible to digital customer experience innovation. They are definitely willing to take tough stands for something they believe in; a shared value of individualism reinforces the Explorer archetype with an emphasis on discovering and expressing one’s own uniqueness.

Right-Time Personalization is for the Explorer more important then ever: when the Explorer archetype is active in your customers, their call is to explore the world and, in the process, to find themselves, so that they know who they are.

To market an Explorer brand effectively, it is best for you to empathize with the Explorer story from the inside, imagining, for example, what it’s like for your customer to feel trapped by his or her own life, to yearn for more excitement and adventure, to feel “bigger” than his life, as though it is constraining him.

Discover also:

  1. The Innocent: Life does not have to be hard, this myth promises.
  2. The Explorer: Don’t fence me in.
  3. The Sage: Sharing wisdom with you.
  4. The Hero: Triumphing over adversity and evil.
  5. The Outlaw: Rules were meant to be broken.
  6. The Magician: the shaman at the forefront of great scientific changes.
  7. The Regular Guy/Gal: The virtues of being ordinary.
  8. The Lover: Intimacy and elegance.
  9. The Jester: To live in the moment with full enjoyment, having fun, and stop worrying about consequences.
  10. The Caregiver: The altruist, moved by compassion, generosity and a desire to help others.
  11. The Creator: Helping you be you (only better).
  12. The Ruler: Queens, kings, CEO’s, presidents, or anyone with power represents the ruler.

How Archetypes Changed How We Think About Digital Customer Experience

archetype_ipad

As a marketer, you have to deal with increasing and global competition. Even if you succeed in creating an advantage for your customers, say an outstanding digital customer experience, a competitor can quickly copy it.

Today, companies are bought out other companies not for what they sold, but for the brands they had established. The brands, with their deeper iconic meetings, were valuable because of the intangible meanings they offered. And the management of this meaning, like many sound ideas, borrows from very ancient and eternal ones.
An archetype can be defined as a model that other things can be patterned on. The perfect example of a type or group. In marketing, you can think of it as a brand “typecast” or “personality type.”

The concept of archetypes was borrowed by Jung from classic sources. In Sanskrit, they were called "subjectively known forms". Carl Jung was the first to call them “archetypes.” “Archetypal psychology helps us understand the intrinsic meaning of product categories and consequently helps marketers create enduring brand identities that establish market dominance, evoke and deliver meaning to customers, and inspire customer loyalty -- all, potentially, in socially responsible ways.” (Carol Pearson and Margaret Mark, The Hero and the Outlaw).

Archetypal psychology helps you understand the intrinsic meaning of product categories and consequently helps you as a marketer create enduring brand identities that start conversations, evoke and deliver meaning to customers, and inspire customer loyalty.

The meaning your brand holds is a primal assets that must be managed as carefully as financial investments, delivering holistic and multi-sensory experiences ranging from view, touch interaction, and sound.

The best and most enduring brands are all archetypal, created to fulfill and embody fundamental human needs, according to neuromarketing and motivation theories:

  1. The Innocent: Life does not have to be hard, this myth promises. The image of innocence conveys the message that you are free to be yourself and to live out your dreams right now.
  2. The Explorer: Don’t fence me in. The explorer seeks a better world. When the Explorer is active in customers, their call is to explore the world and, in the process, to find themselves, so that they know who they are. How did Starbucks convince people to pay over two dollars for coffee? Simple: the Explorer, artfully expressed in every detail: the product, the packaging, the shops, the logo, the name, and the experience of placing an order.
  3. The Sage: Sharing wisdom with you. The sage’s central wisdom is an individual way of finding paradise. The sage wants to be free to think and believes in mankind’s capacity to grow.
  4. The Hero: Triumphing over adversity and evil. John Kennedy, John Wayne, John Glenn and, of course, all superheroes are heroes.
  5. The Outlaw: Rules were meant to be broken. This archetype has the attraction of forbidden fruit (yes, think about Apple).
  6. The Magician: How to get things done. The magician believes in understanding the rules and using them to accomplish specific goals. The magician has traditionally been the shaman and is at the forefront of great scientific changes.
  7. The Regular Guy/Girl: The virtues of being ordinary. The regular guy symbolizes situation comedies, country and other easy listening music.
  8. The Lover: Intimacy and elegance. The Lover governs all forms of human love. The Lover is common in the cosmetics, jewelry, fashion, and travel industries.
  9. The Jester: his motto: to live in the moment with full enjoyment; the Jester archetype wants us all to lighten up, have fun, and stop worrying about consequences.
  10. The Caregiver: Doing well by doing good. The caregiver is an altruist, moved by compassion, generosity and a desire to help others.
  11. The Creator: Helping you be you (only better). The creator represents the artist, the writer, the entrepreneur and the innovator. Mozart and Picasso are symbols of the creator myth.
  12. The Ruler: Who’s in charge here? The ruler represents queens, kings, CEO’s, presidents or even capable career mothers. Margaret Thatcher and Winston Churchill, or anyone with power can be considered the ruler.

Myths and archetypes found all around the world are basically expressions of our inner human drama: we can understand them as different expressions of an eternal impulse to find our meaning in the mystery of creation. We “recognize” them because our brains have been programmed to do so.

And if you have only a few seconds to get your message across a customer-facing app or a responsive web site, you can do so more effectively if your message taps into the stories we all know already.

Shaping your digital customer experience without a system for managing the meaning of your brand is analogous to ancient navigators trying to find port in treacherous seas on a starless night. What all brands need today, be they a product, or a company, or yourself, is a reliable compass.

Whatever archetype you choose, or are chosen by, use these pages as your GPS and drive all your efforts to support that message consistently, as you will be trusted to the degree that everything you do is consistent.

Further insights for you on How To Connect With Your Digital Customers by Mapping Your Digital Customer Journey, Mobile First in our 7 steps digital customer experience checklist.

The Innocent Brand Archetype: Seeking Fulfillment in the Here and Now

Innocent_Babies_Wallpapers_04

Understanding Brand archetypes is a powerful tool for helping you go beneath the surface and meet invisible and emerging needs.

According to the first archetype that we investigate, the Innocent, life does not have to be hard. The image of innocence conveys the message that you are free to be yourself and to live out your dreams right now.

Movie stars like Meg Ryan and Tom Hanks and Kate Winslet are also brands of the innocent, with movies that started from Forrest Gump, moved to Titanic approaching end of millenium, to then evolve into a more complex representation with American Beauty.

Innocent products include McDonald’s, Ivory, Mattel and Disney. Many brands appeal to the innocent archetype by promising salvation from an imperfect world.

This archetype is a good identity for brands that provide simple answers, have low to moderate prices and are produced by a company with arrow-straight values.

The innocent seeks fulfillment in the here and now, looks for products that provide the experience of peace and goodness right now, like to find a brand they can trust and stick to it, believing that “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.” Applies to products that make life simple, such as a user-friendly smartphone.

The Innocent archetype provides a good framework for brands and associated digital customer experiences that:

  • Provide a relatively simple answer to an identifiable problem.
  • Are associated with goodness, morality, simplicity, nostalgia, or childhood.
  • Have functions associated with cleanliness, health, or virtue — and that are infinitely replicable.
  • Are priced moderate to low.
  • Are produced by a company with straight-arrow core values.
  • Desire to differentiate from a product with a tarnished image.

Discover also:

  1. The Innocent: Life does not have to be hard, this myth promises.

  2. The Explorer
    : Don’t fence me in.

  3. The Sage
    : Sharing wisdom with you.

  4. The Hero: Triumphing over adversity and evil.
  5. The Outlaw
    : Rules were meant to be broken.

  6. The Magician
    : The shaman at the forefront of great scientific changes.

  7. The Regular Guy/Girl
    : The virtues of being ordinary.

  8. The Lover: Intimacy and elegance.
  9. The Jester: To live in the moment with full enjoyment, having fun, and stop worrying about consequences.
  10. The Caregiver: The altruist, moved by compassion, generosity and a desire to help others.
  11. The Creator: Helping you be you (only better).
  12. The Ruler: Queens, kings, CEO’s, presidents, or anyone with power represents the ruler.

Market Smarter with a Digital Customer Experience Analytics Dashboard

Use_a_Digital_Customer_Experience_Analytics_Dashboard_to_Market_Smarter

To make the right marketing decisions to adapt your Digital Customer Experience to rapidly changing events, you must know what has happened while interacting with your customer, why it happened, what the potential results of different actions might be and what actions you have to take.

Answering those questions requires fast access to sound, pertinent data, collected across all digital channels and touch-points between your brand and your customers: a DCX Analytics Dashboard.

Your company probably already uses a “scoring system.” It might even track “key performance indicators” (KPIs) or take advantage of “balanced scorecards.” If so, you might already be disappointed by how little these tools improve your performance and skeptical as to whether a different approach can have a significant impact in your marketing performance.

In order for a DCX Analytics Dashboard to be useful and deliver on your ultimate aim of helping make better decisions, you have to consider its single most important basic characteristic: to be aligned with your corporate goals:

  • Establish quantitative and qualitative DCX metrics specific to your organization and industry.
  • Move beyond simplistic vanity metrics from Twitter or Facebook. Track not just quantity (how many “likes” or how many fans, or people talk about you, how many people enter your physical and digital properties), but also “sentiment metrics” (whether those talks are “positive, negative or neutral”) and “dispersion metrics” (how widely comments vary), and "business metrics" how many customers are repeat ones, how many actually make a purchase, how much do they spend.
  • Shape your digital customer experience to be “globally integrated”, by adopting a company-wide standardized metric, and “locally customized.”

And finally, to make your DCX analytics truly actionable, implement a dashboard that leads to action, and help you and your marketing and sales team leverage big data to make instant decisions and take immediate action that translate into:

  • more relevant product recommendations;
  • well received push notifications;
  • social sharing to your customer’s peers.

In essence, among big ideas for 2014, start today shaping a DCX Analytics Dashboard that helps you drive more sales and implement it.

Here’s Why Digital Customer Experience in Automotive is So Relevant

Here’s_Why_Digital_Customer_Experience_in_Automotive_is_So_Relevant_Tesla_640

Car manufacturers have understood the importance of delivering a personalized and consistent digital experience to customers across all touch devices and in the car.

A native digital customer experience that is more engaging and entertaining for users, regardless of the changing channels through which they interact and purchase.

Equally relevant is the capability to amp up sales efficiency - whether it’s offering recommendations for related products, setting real-time pricing, handing out perks.

We at Neosperience are addressing this challenge via a set of Apple iOS, Google Android, Microsoft Windows Phone, and HTML5 pre-built modules, which render a consistent experience across the different smartphone, tablet and smart TV form factors, delivering customer engagement before the purchase and after, whether drivers are digitally engaged at home, at work, in-store or in-car.

By focusing on connected vehicle innovation, we aim at speeding-up the industry evolution from a product to a customer experience-centric value proposition, turning automotive players into technology leaders.

Thanks to this effort, automotive players will be able to create and access cloud computing resources, data sources and real-time analytics, leveraging sophisticated data - both vehicle and customer-related - to turn big data into big insights for use by third-parties and governments (e.g., traffic infrastructure utilization data), paving the way towards a future leadership in self-driving vehicle offerings.

Neosperience for CarPlay and Android Auto will allow people to use all digital customer experience functionality without actually touching the device. You can jump start by supporting the emerging behavior of vehicle owners in purchasing songs, audio books or movies from within their vehicles, to evolve the vision of self-aware vehicles as the foundation for improving safety and road utilization, optimizing traffic flow, managing drivers’ cognitive load.

How To FIRE Your Customer-facing App

FIRE_Your_Customer-facing_App

Just finished reading an insightful new book from project management pro and military technology expert Dan Ward. An informative writing with wonderful asides and management war stories.

The insight: the best customer experience platforms and tools aren’t the most expensive and complicated.

And the proper way of doing them can be summarized in the FIRE acronym, inspired by the lean design principles, is embedded in the approach and tools used by some of the best technology developers in the world:

  • Fast” – The shorter the schedule and timeline are, the better your project outcome will be.
  • Inexpensive” – A small budget is more functional than a big budget. Financial capital is not the key factor; intellectual capital is what really matters.
  • Restrained” – Limit the documents you create, the time of the meetings you conduct, the budgets you allocate, the teams you direct and the schedules you set.
  • Elegant” – Shoot for project elements that are pleasingly ingenious and simple. Prioritize true design maturity and true process simplicity.

You are far more likely to deliver top-shelf results when you are working under constraints than when you are getting all the money, time and people you think you need. It seems counterintuitive, but in typical digital customer experience projects, such as customer-facing app developments, leaders who get large budgets, large teams and long schedules are unlikely to meet all – or even most – of their project objectives.

Actually project leaders with the largest budgets are statistically most likely to ask for more money and least likely to deliver an actual working product. The more time and money you spend on the thing, the more complicated it gets, which in turn drives up the cost and schedule even further as we wrestle with all the complexity.

In addition to FIRE, a good complement to maximize your effectiveness as a digital customer experience project leader is NASA’s “Faster, Better, Cheaper” (FCB) program, built on five operating principles:

  1. Do it wrong” – Create numerous “quick-and-dirty prototypes.” Many will fail, but you can learn from your mistakes.
  2. Reject good ideas” – Stay focused on the primary goal for your project.
  3. Simplify and accelerate” – Design your work to be clear and quick.
  4. Avoid innovation for innovation's sake” – For easier, faster testing and operating.
  5. Failure is an option” – If everything works perfectly, you’re not pushing the limits.

In a world of rapid change, long-term projects are a losing proposition:

  • Apply FIRE and FCB, focusing on building things you know how to build, using things you know how to use.
  • Don’t try to reinvent the wheel, the world is a big place with billions of people and a plenty of tools: be clever, do your research, then choose and use the right platform and partner.
  • Simplicity ain’t simple, while complexity usuallyindicates an immature design.

Your most successful projects will always be the least complicated.

The Digital Customer Experience Blog

This site, published by Neosperience, overviews the advancements of digital customer experience in marketing, technology and society. Neosperience Cloud is the technology platform to create engaging experiences for your customers that drive ongoing loyalty to your brand, and faster paths to purchase. It is the choice of the best companies in the world, Winner of the most prestigious global awards across many industries: Automotive, Communications, Media and Services, Consumer Products, Retail and Distribution, Fashion, Luxury and Beauty, Financial Services, Healthcare, Utilities, Government and Infrastructure, Travel and Transportation.

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